Can Dogs Eat Wild Mushrooms? The Answer Is No, And Here’s Why…

can dogs eat wild mushrooms

Can dogs eat wild mushrooms? Whether or not a dog can eat a mushroom is dependent on the type of the mushroom, but believe us when we say dogs should never eat wild mushrooms. But generally speaking, as long as the mushroom is fit for human consumption, it is fine for dogs to eat as well, which means most store-bought mushrooms are ok but the ones growing in your yard are not. So, if you notice your dog eating a mushroom off the bark of a tree while on a walk, get to a vet ASAP. Let’s take a look at some mushrooms dogs can eat and those that they shouldn’t:

Mushrooms That Dogs Can Eat

Some of the mushrooms that your pup can eat include:

As a matter of fact, small amounts of these mushrooms can be very beneficial to the pooch’s health. Portobello mushrooms contain decent amounts of potassium, beta-glucans, selenium, and zinc essential to the dog for a healthy immune system. The selenium in shiitake mushrooms acts as an antioxidant and protects cells from damage by free radicals. Shiitakes also help with arthritis and cancer. Reishi mushrooms have been used to strengthen a dog’s heart and increase their energy levels. Just make sure to feed these mushrooms to dogs in moderation if you want to take advantage of the health benefits they provide.

Mushrooms Dogs Should Never Eat

Some mushrooms like wild mushrooms can make your dog quite ill, so it’s important to know which ones are ok and which ones are not. A few of the mushrooms that should be avoided include:

  • Fly agaric
  • Gyromitra esculenta
  • Galerina marginata
  • Fools webcap
  • Death cap
  • Jeweled death cap
  • Panther cap
  • Destroying angel
  • Angel wings

Even a few of these wild mushrooms could prove to be harmful to your dog if you don’t act quickly. You should never let your dog eat these mushrooms. If your dog eats any of these mushrooms, call the vet right away. Never feed your dog any mushroom that you can’t identify, and never feed your dog wild mushrooms unless you’re sure they’re safe. Remember that your dog should never eat any mushrooms growing in your yard or the park. If you suspect poisoning, get to a vet immediately and let them know what mushrooms your dog ate.

Why Dogs Shouldn’t Eat Wild Mushrooms

Wild mushrooms can cause mushroom poisoning in dogs which is very dangerous and can be fatal. If your dog has eaten a toxic mushroom, you might see symptoms within the first few hours after the ingestion. Some of these symptoms include:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Stomach pain
  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Bleeding
  • Yellowing of the skin
  • Weakness
  • Excessive drooling
  • Seizures
  • Liver failure
  • Coma
  • Death

If your dog is showing any of these symptoms, it is very important that you get to a vet right away. And if you can’t recognize the type of mushroom your dog ate, you could bring any leftovers for identification. Also, consider taking a sample of the dog’s vomit to the vet in case they ask you to bring it in.

Conclusion

Wild mushrooms are not good for dogs to eat. On the other hand, normally cultivated mushrooms can be very beneficial to your dog’s health if they are fed in moderation. Also, always make sure you know exactly what type of mushroom your dog is eating before he/she eats it or you could end up spending thousands of dollars on vet bills. If you spot signs of vomiting, diarrhea, or any other symptoms of mushroom poisoning in your dog, take them to the vet immediately to prevent further damage and/or death.

Thank you for reading the article.

To explore more, here are other mushroom-related dog articles that you might be interested in.

Did you already know about the risks associated with feeding wild mushrooms to dogs?  What type of mushrooms do you give to your dog? We would love to hear from you. Please share with our community by leaving a comment below!

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