Can Dogs Eat Wild Garlic? Everything You Need To Know About Wild Garlic & Why It Is Bad For Dogs

can dogs eat wild garlic

Wild garlic is similar to garlic in taste but it is a little different from its’ cultivated counterpart. It has a slightly less pungent smell compared to normal garlic cloves. But similar to cultivated garlic, wild garlic belongs to the Allium family. And regardless of the taste or smell, all kind of plants belonging to the Allium family is considered toxic to dogs. However, it is safe for dogs to eat garlic in small amounts. And similar to the cultivated garlic, dogs can also eat wild garlic, provided in moderation.

Here’s a detailed answer to the question, ‘Can dogs eat wild garlic?’

 Wild Garlic For Dogs – Good Or Bad?

As we stated above, wild garlic is similar to cultivated garlic in taste and smell. And because of this similarity, it is safe to eat wild garlic in limited quantities. At the same time, wild garlic maintains the same health benefits as its’ cultivated counterpart. Some of the benefits of feeding dogs’ wild garlic occasionally include prevention of ticks and fleas, reduction of blood pressure, treatment of flatulence, colds, and coughs, treatment of Kennel cough among others.

However, in larger quantities, wild garlic can be toxic to dogs. Some of the side effects in your dog when it eats too much wild garlic include irritation in the digestive tract, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, depression, and loss of appetite. The reason why garlic is considered toxic to dogs is that it contains a compound called thiosulfate which is linked to oxidative damage of the body cells. If your dog eats large amounts of wild garlic over extended periods of time it can also cause anemia due to loss of red blood cells, known as hemolytic anemia. This is a life-threatening condition that may only be treated by blood transfusion. Delayed treatment may claim the life of a dog, so it is important that you take action immediately if you think your dog has eaten too much wild garlic.

What Amount Of Wild Garlic Can Dogs Eat?

5 grams of garlic per kilogram of the dogs’ bodyweight is considered the standard toxic amount. Consequently, it means dogs can eat under 5 grams of garlic per kilogram of their body weight. For example, a 20 kg pooch can eat between 1 to around 9 grams of garlic. But keep in mind that garlic shouldn’t be a regular part of the dog’s diet. Normal consumption is recommended to be limited to once or twice a week.

If you find your dog has eaten a larger quantity of garlic and is feeling ill, it is recommended that you bring him to the veterinarian before any irreversible system damage is done. The vet will be able to determine the quantity of garlic ingested and treat your dog accordingly.

Conclusion

Yes, dogs can eat wild garlic in small quantities. However, dogs shouldn’t eat wild garlic more than once or twice a week because of the toxic effects of frequent ingestion. Dogs that have eaten too much wild garlic may develop adverse effects such as irritation in the digestive tract, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, depression, loss of appetite, and even anemia. So make sure you feed your dog wild garlic in moderation if you ever plan on doing so. And if you suspect that your dog has eaten too much wild garlic then seek out vet treatment immediately to avoid any further damage.

Thank you for reading the article.

Here are all of our garlic-related articles.

While any food with garlic might not prove toxic immediately (if fed in moderation), too much garlic can lead to severe health problems, and if not treated well could lead to death in dogs. This is especially true for Japanese breed dogs such as Akitas and Shiba Inu. Find all about it in our article, ‘Can dogs eat garlic?’

Have you ever given wild garlic to your pup? What was his/her reaction? We would love to hear from you. Please share with our community in the comment section below.

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