Can Dogs Eat Cooked Celery? The Best Natural Treat To Spice Up Your Dog’s Life!

can dogs eat cooked celery

You’ll be pleasantly surprised to learn that your dog doesn’t have to live on dry food only. Dogs can eat vegetables and lots of them too! This is a great option for picky eaters or if you’re trying to add more vegetables to your dog’s diet. Serving vegetables to your dog can be done in many ways such as by cooking, baking, boiling, roasting, grilling, or even dehydrating. Generally, when it comes to celery, dogs do enjoy munching on raw and juicy green stalks of celery but how about giving your dog a cooked celery treat? Most importantly can dogs eat cooked celery?

Yes, cooked celery is safe for your pup’s consumption. In fact, it is one of the best natural food to spice up your dog’s life! This article lists out everything you need to know about feeding a cooked celery treat for dogs.

Is Cooked Celery Beneficial to Dogs?

While cooking seems to be the healthiest way to give your dog a celery treat, you might be unaware that cooking celery destroys the vitamins present in it. Dogs can eat cooked celery but it does not provide them any substantial nutrients. The only benefit you get from cooking celery is that celery becomes soft enough for small puppies to consume it.

Even if you’ve cooked the celery, we still advise you to cut it further into small pieces, especially if you have a small breed dog. Some owners do this to avoid choking issues.

Things To Avoid in Your Dog’s Celery Bowl

Another thing you must remember is that while cooking, you must exclude herbs and spices that are harmful to dogs. Some of them are listed below:

Aromatic herbs like onions, chives, and garlic can destroy blood cells and cause low iron levels in your dog’s body. This ultimately causes harm to their kidneys. While store-bought mushrooms are safe for feeding, you must avoid wild mushrooms as they are toxic for your pups. In the worst situation, mushrooms may result in severe conditions such as organ failure, seizures, or even coma in your dog.

What Vegetables Can I Include in My Dog’s Celery Bowl?

Some other vegetables that are totally safe for dogs and can fit in well with cooked celery in a bowl are:

  • Carrots
  • Green Beans
  • Beets
  • Cucumber
  • Spinach
  • Broccoli
  • Sweet Potato

These veggies are not only safe but healthy for dogs too. For example, green beans contain essential vitamins B6, A, C, and K, in addition to minerals like calcium and iron. These nutrients help in the growth of your puppies and also green beans are low in calories and rich in fiber, which can help dogs fully. Similarly, Beets provide fiber, folate, manganese, and potassium that help in your dog’s digestion and help to maintain a healthy coat and fur.

How Much Cooked Celery Can I Feed My Dog?

Cooked celeries are still celeries and can be given as a treat. According to AKCCanineHealthFoundation, treats must not exceed more than 10 percent of your dog’s daily diet. Excessive treats may cause extreme obesity and other major health concerns too.  So to serve your dog a treat of cooked celery, you don’t have to estimate the weight of treat and celery precisely; instead, you can evaluate. For instance, if your dog has a full meal bowl, you are not supposed to give a bowl full of celery. You can always ask your vet for help if you cannot figure out the proportions.

Conclusion

All in all, cooked celeries are safe for dogs. However, you must exclude some of the toxic herbs while cooking it. As a responsible owner, you would love to keep your dog healthy by supplying extra nutrients for their body, right?

Thank you for reading the article.

Now that you know cooked celeries are good for dogs, find out all about celery-related articles in celery for dogs.

Have you tried feeding cooked celery to your dog? How do you prepare a bowl of celery? We would love to know. Please share with our community by leaving a comment below!

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